Comments for Stronger at the Broken Places http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com Student Veterans and the Long Walk Home from War Mon, 22 Feb 2016 21:53:18 +0000 hourly 1 Comment on Lesson Learned: Sympathy –Tony by Zachary Ruesch http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/lesson-learned-sympathy-tony/#comment-563 Mon, 22 Feb 2016 21:53:18 +0000 http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/?p=2107#comment-563 This was a good read. It caused me to ponder my own perspective and experiences regarding sympathy/empathy. I was inspired to write after thinking about things from another perspective, but I prefer to keep it private. Thanks for writing and sharing Tony. Good stuff on point, Pointer. Get some!

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Comment on Don’t let silence become the story of your life by Veteran Voices Pt. 1: Don’t Let Silence Be the Story of Your Life http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/dont-let-silence-become-the-story-of-your-life/#comment-494 Mon, 28 Dec 2015 06:01:14 +0000 http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/?p=448#comment-494 […] on this topic, we are bringing you excerpts from Professor David Chrisinger’s blog “Stronger at the Broken Places,” which you can also follow on […]

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Comment on What did I bring home from war? –Anonymous by Elizabeth ##comment-425 Fri, 13 Nov 2015 17:29:23 +0000 http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/?p=2123#comment-425 Wow. Damn. I mean: WOW.

I’m a (civilian) therapist that has worked with combat veterans for many years, and this is the clearest, most articulate, most eloquent description of that complicated journey I’ve ever come across. Just today, I spoke with a group of therapists who were trying to understand how to work with veterans better. It’s so hard to speak to what someone can never really graps – but this essay has hit the target. Truly. I’ve already forwarded it to that group: Here. This. Here is what you have to grapple with if you sincerely want to ‘get’ veterans.

Thank you so much for posting this. I’m not clear if it’s written by “Anonymous” or from David Chrisinger. But please pass this on to whoever spoke so succinctly to that unholy process of being changed forever. Whoever you are, keep speaking. Keep writing. We’re listening.

Sincerely,
Elizabeth

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Comment on Walking off the War by Michael http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/walking-off-the-war/#comment-422 Sun, 08 Nov 2015 23:08:10 +0000 http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/?p=70#comment-422 I also didn’t know that walking relieves stress and that it was a reason they use to do it after the wars. I always figured it was due mostly to the lack of transportation and having no choice. That being said I enjoy hiking but in moderation. I don’t think I could hike the entire trail or that I would even want to attempt it.

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Comment on Walking off the War by Nick http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/walking-off-the-war/#comment-418 Wed, 04 Nov 2015 17:05:59 +0000 http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/?p=70#comment-418 This has always been a dream of mine. hopefully I can go on one of my summer breaks or once I finish with school. I had never thought about this being a stress relief for the older generations. I always knew they had to walk back. I even thought about how much it must suck that you are finally out of war, yet you are still months from being home. Thinking about it this way I am actually a little envious that we did not have anything similar. Just thrown back into the daily routine.

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Comment on Walking off the War by Brian http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/walking-off-the-war/#comment-417 Wed, 04 Nov 2015 15:15:52 +0000 http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/?p=70#comment-417 Three days is not much of a turn around. I don’t blame people for wanting to come back right away. They have families and love ones that have waited months for them to return. Hiking would seem like a good stress relieve but knowing your family is safe and you are there with them is even better.

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Comment on Walking off the War by Shane http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/walking-off-the-war/#comment-416 Wed, 04 Nov 2015 14:53:08 +0000 http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/?p=70#comment-416 I have always pretty much known that exercise relieves stress. I’ve been athletic most of my life I did spend a lot of time walking I don’t know if a hike that long would do any good, for me personally but I do concur that it probably would help a lot of other combat stressed soldiers.

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Comment on Walking off the War by Cole Swanson http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/walking-off-the-war/#comment-414 Wed, 04 Nov 2015 04:18:39 +0000 http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/?p=70#comment-414 I honestly didn’t know that walking relieves stress, but it makes sense because it’s the same thing as working out. You release endorphin’s that cause your brain to make happy and positive thoughts. I can see myself doing this because I love working out. It helps me relieve stress, and it helps me look good. Walking would make my legs nice and toned along with getting my mind into happy thoughts.

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Comment on Walking off the War by Cody http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/walking-off-the-war/#comment-413 Wed, 04 Nov 2015 03:27:16 +0000 http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/?p=70#comment-413 I would love to do this sometime before i die. I agree big time about the stress relief. even before i joined the military i used to go walk the woods all the time i don’t know its something about the peace and quiet that allow you to just relax and think about life. sometimes that’s all you need.

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Comment on Walking off the War by Austin http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/walking-off-the-war/#comment-412 Wed, 04 Nov 2015 03:05:47 +0000 http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/?p=70#comment-412 I think with the right gear and allotted time I would enjoy hiking the Appalachian trail. I’ve always enjoyed long walks even as a kid. It really helps decompress and with the right people so many things can be talked about during a long walk to the point where you forget how long you’ve actually been walking. At the same time I don’t know how much decompression will help coming back from an active war zone. Once the realities set in from the real world stress levels will go back up and the same issues will continue.

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Comment on Walking off the War by Sam http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/walking-off-the-war/#comment-411 Wed, 04 Nov 2015 01:09:51 +0000 http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/?p=70#comment-411 It’s interesting to think about how quickly we can come back from a foreign country in less than 72hrs, compared to prior generations. I’m sure walking a couple hundred miles really gave someone time to decompress and get their head on as right as possible. There are some units, now, that have a two week long decompression period, on top of their post deployment leave, that that go to in order to help get back into life at home.

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Comment on Walking off the War by Danny http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/walking-off-the-war/#comment-410 Wed, 04 Nov 2015 00:45:55 +0000 http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/?p=70#comment-410 I agree that hiking reduces a lot of personal stress. I had the chance to hike Iwo Jima and Mt Fuji it takes a lot of your mind to relax and and think about past generations who had fought in the hardest battles of the pacific. This would be a challenge I would love to do in the oncoming future when I go back to the east coast.

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Comment on Walking off the War by Tony http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/walking-off-the-war/#comment-409 Tue, 03 Nov 2015 22:58:49 +0000 http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/?p=70#comment-409 I would love to do something like this. Hiking is such a great time. Some friends and I would walk the trails through parts of the black forest in German or we would travel to to the Dolimites in Italy. On one of the mountain tops in Italy we found an old bunker and Machine-gun sights. It was pretty cool.

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Comment on Walking off the War by Benjamin http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/walking-off-the-war/#comment-408 Tue, 03 Nov 2015 21:33:28 +0000 http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/?p=70#comment-408 This article is very interesting since me and my friend that was in the army wants to hike this trail, the pacific coast trail witch is longer and the continental divide trail that is the longest. there is a web site that talks about all three of these and only about 196 hikers have ever completed all three and been granted the triple crown of hiking award. I agree that walking is a good stress reliever and depression reliever also.

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Comment on Walking off the War by Nicole http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/walking-off-the-war/#comment-407 Tue, 03 Nov 2015 21:31:42 +0000 http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/?p=70#comment-407 After reading this article I realized that I do like to do a lot of walking and that walking the Appellation Mountains would be a great experience. I just don’t know if I would like to do the whole thing. It would require me to take a lot of time off and walk for a very long time and I don’t think I would be able to walk the whole thing at the moment. I might do it in the future I’m just not sure yet if I will or not.

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Comment on My Great Sadness –Anonymous by doug http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/my-great-sadness-anonymous/#comment-395 Thu, 01 Oct 2015 06:33:29 +0000 http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/?p=1991#comment-395 I have believed for a long time that many of us become addicts to our own body chemicals, the endorphins and adrenaline released in high stress, high risk, high activity, moments.

I know I am, even 40 years after leaving the service I crave just one more hit of that high.

Since leaving I have always been in volunteer emergency services, not because it’s a good thing for the community but because it gives me that rush that only turning out to an emergency does, there is nothing quite like it.

I am now old grey and overweight, I am still a volunteer firefighter for my town brigade because I love that hit when the pager goes off and I grab my gear.

I also love the peace of open desert country and wide wild untamed spaces, they restore my soul.

I can understand what you say and a bit of how you feel.

I hope understanding your “Addiction” and how to get a fix in a beneficial way helps you readjust to the world.

Part of you will always be there looking out over the sandbags though, understand that is now embedded in your soul and nothing will ever remove it.

Stay safe

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Comment on Shell-Shocked — and After by Cheryl http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/shell-shocked-and-after/#comment-338 Wed, 24 Jun 2015 01:19:45 +0000 http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/?p=266#comment-338 I’m glad you published this. War is glamorized in the movies, but it is hell. I met a brother of a friend. The brother had served in WWII and he was shell shocked. I met another man who would come over to the lunch cafeteria and walk around and greet students. It is tragic.

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Comment on Do you have what it takes? –Trey Hess by doug Steley http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/do-you-have-what-it-takes-trey-hess/#comment-296 Sat, 09 May 2015 06:38:41 +0000 http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/?p=1707#comment-296 as an old man you are right

Being a man means you are brave enough to do what is needed when it is needed, that includes being there for your kids and your partner, doing the shopping and playing in the park.

Reading bedtime stories every night.

That makes you a real man a real partner and a real father.

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Comment on No More Drunken Camp Fires: Chase Vuchetich on Vets Telling Stories by doug Steley http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/no-more-drunken-camp-fires-chase-vuchetich-on-vets-telling-stories/#comment-295 Sat, 09 May 2015 06:32:25 +0000 http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/?p=872#comment-295 The book “Chickenhawk” By Robert Manson is probably one of the best descriptive writing by a soldier I have ever read, if you are interested in the Vietnam experience and how he wrote it is a good read.

http://www.amazon.com/Chickenhawk-Robert-Mason/dp/0143035711

“Slaughterhouse 5” by Kurt Vonnegut Jnr is a wonderful science fiction tale of PTSD from world war 2, untill you have PTSD it is just a science fiction novel, afterwards the flashbacks become more real and more understandable.

Catch 22 is still the best description of the sheer madness and insanity of war.

Thanks for your story, I was air force but a photographer, I never saw active service as you did but the things I saw and photographed are sufficient, I am now retired with a pension and PTSD.

Cheers Stay safe

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Comment on Another Day, Another Walk –Chase Vuchetich by Monica http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/another-day-another-walk-chase-vuchetich/#comment-289 Thu, 30 Apr 2015 19:28:18 +0000 http://strongeratthebrokenplaces.com/?p=1761#comment-289 “I am not broken. […] I will never give up on life. That would dishonor those who gave theirs for me, and I am not weak. I could easily crawl into a bottle of Jameson again, but that is a temporary solution to a permanent problem.”

Your physical and emotional strength inspires me.

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